EclipseCon Europe 2016 – I’m coming!

130x130 I'm Speaking logo

I’m sitting now in the train on my way to Ludwigsburg. For sure I cannot miss this great event, where so many smart people and friends come together. Although ECE is always at the same time of the year and I knew for long that I want to go there again, it comes not at the best time for me – or better: for my family. The reason is a really positive one: Almost 3 weeks ago on October 4th I became for the second time father of a lovely daughter, Sophia.


I am missing her already deeply, and my wife would need some supporting hands at home right now. However she understands that EclipseCon is important for me and supports me. The past weeks I did not get much sleep, but the reason was mostly not Sophia, but mainly preparing my talks – in the late evening and night it was most suitable. I will definitely enjoy EclipseCon, but this year I will also be happy when I can leave towards home again and will take 3 days off afterwards for regeneration and caring for the family.

This year’s EclipseCon will be fully packed for me. Today, on Sunday, it will start with a small pre-conference event at the Rossknecht, where the Eclipse Scout community comes together. Tomorrow at the Unconference day I will attend the Eclipse Scout User Day, which I attended the past two years already. At the moment I do not work with Scout, but I really enjoyed working with this framework in the past and would like to do another project with it again. The recent year Scout has much evolved, and I am keen to learn all the news.

On tuesday the Xtext developers plan to schedule a BoF Session. A beta of Xtext 2.11 was released this week, and we have to work much now to make the 2.11 release round. I plan to invest quite some time on this, and we have to talk about the concrete tasks and collaboration. Since we are now a team spanning several companies, it is important to have the chance to get the whole team together at EclipseCon.

On wednesday it is time for action. I was recently contacted that the proposal for the session “Recipes to build Code Generators for Non-Xtext Models with Xtend” got picked from the waiting list. I will perform the talk with my colleague and friend Holger Schill.

screenshot 68.png

We give this talk because Xtend is a very nice language when it comes to developing template based code generators, but is mostly only used in the context of Xtext. Xtext projects seamlessly integrate a generator infrastructure with Xtend, but it is not that common to use Xtend based generators with models that are not Xtext DSL files. We will show how simple it can be to integrate Xtend for other use cases, e.g. with JSON as input.

After that talk we will participate at the Modeling Symposium (17:45 Theater Stage). There we will shortly (7 minutes slot only) present a generator fragment that creates an extension package for VisualStudio Code to embed support for a DSL with an embedded language server. The Language Server Protocol support is the main feature for Xtext 2.11. We plan to contribute the created generator fragment to the Xtext project.

On thursday it is time for my talk “From stairway to heaven onto the highway to hell with Xtext” (11:00 Theater Stage). In this talk I will explain why I love Xtext and why it is used successfully in so many projects first, but then discuss where users have or run into trouble when using the framework. We see in many projects that first steps are easily done and don’t require much experience, but as requirements grow the complexity of DSL projects also grow and extensive experience with details of Xtext and the technologies behind is crucial. I hopefully compiled an informative set of issues.

screenshot 69.png

One Xpand user less, one happy Xtend user more

This week I am consulting a customer who had introduced a model based development approach based almost 10 years ago and used it with success since then. At the time back then Xpand was the most powerful code generation engine and UML models were often used to generate code from. Xtext did not even exist at that time. The customer uses Enterprise Architect and the Enterprise Architect exporter from the components4oaw. The last release was in 2011 and the project has not been developed further. For my customer the component just did what it should, so there was no direct need to change anything at the process. The EA exporter has its flaws, especially since it needs an Enterprise Architect installation and this means it only works on Windows machines. For Enterprise Architect users who do model based development, we therefore offer the YAKINDU Enterprise Architect Bridge, which scales better and can process .eap models on any platform.

My task was to help the customer to modernize their tool chain. To be fair, Xpand is not the right choice anymore. The Xtend Language combines the strengths from Xpand (great templating support, functional programming, static typing, polymorphic dispatch, mature Eclipse tooling) and resolved some weaknesses (performance, compiled code instead of interpreted, Java integration, extensibility of expressions).

For the customer who never had used Xtend so far, but was quite familiar with Xpand, it was quite a surprise how close both languages really are. Most of the concepts can be mapped 1:1 from good old Xpand to Xtend. We created a small generator from scratch and copied functions and templates and translated them manually for demonstration. They understood Xtend within minutes then. Most of the work is monkey-see-monkey-do. For such cases I wrote a small migration script which can translate Xpand,Xtend(1) and Check code to Xtend(2) classes. We used that script now for an initial translation.

One of the reasons why this migration script is not published is that cannot translate Xpand code completely to Xtend. The tool parses Xpand templates and traverses the AST to transform the expressions to Xtend equivalents. But it does not know about the type system which is used by the generator.

And here Xtend is not as powerful as Xpand, especially when using UML. In Xpand, the UML type system adapter analyzed the applied profiles of a model to create virtual types for stereotypes. Elements with stereotypes applied can be processed as if they were of a subtype of the extended type, and tagged values became attributes. In Xtend, there is only the Java type system, and for processing UML models this means that templates have to use the UML metamodel directly. The old “feeling” of a real type system can be simulated with a set of extension functions. I usually introduce an extension class per profile which offers for example a method per tagged value. The creation of such an extension class can again be automated by generating it from a profile .uml model.

Another disadvantage against the Xpand framework is that Xtend is not a code generation framework, but a general purpose programming language. How a generator component looks like that invokes the templates, where to produce output to, how to integrate constraint checks, this all is not provided.

What I usually do here is to use Xtext’s infrastructure like the IGenerator interface and validation based on Xtext’s AbstractDeclarativeValidator and @Check annotations. I reuse Xtext’s MWE Reader and Generator component. However, this requires some work and advanced knowledge. The basic approach is here to make UML models recognized by Xtext as a generic EMF resource. To actually use the Xtext components, a generator specific Guice module has to be created which extends AbstractGenericResourceRuntimeModule and satisfy several dependencies which an Xtext language already as configured by default. A good part of the approach was described by Christian Dietrich in his blog posts “Xtend2 Code Generators with Non-Xtext Models” and “Xtext 2.0 and UML“. I may go into details in a later blog post.

Although Xtend is such a natural choice for writing code generators and it is so well-integrated in the Xtext ecosystem, there is framework support missing for non-Xtext models. It is easy to write a trivial framework, but why should everyone start writing their own when good infrastructure already exists in the Xtext framework? From what I experienced again, there is need to have some more framework support for this use case. I doubt that it could be part of Xtext itself, but maybe we will provide a framework for Xtend based code generators in the future.

At the end we were able to show and demonstrate a migration path in one single workshop day. The customer was happy to save several days or weeks of time. The workshop costs were compensated by far for them. From a sales perspective it might not be wise to leave a customer in a state where he is not dependent on our services in the next time, but this is not how we work. For me it feels right.

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.

Xbase Customization: Redefining operator keywords

If you use Xbase in your Xtext based DSL, you are usually satisfied with the set of operators the expression language defines. They are closely related to what you are used to in Java or similar languages.

However, in a customer’s workshop the customer wished to have custom keywords for some operators. For example, the operator && should be alternatively presented as AND, and the || operator as OR.

To demonstrate this customization we’ll start with Xtext’s famous Domainmodel Example. The Domainmodel.xtext grammar is derived from org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.Xbase and the Operation rule uses an XBlockExpression for the Operation’s body:

grammar org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.Domainmodel with org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.Xbase


	'op' name=ValidID '(' (params+=FullJvmFormalParameter (',' params+=FullJvmFormalParameter)*)? ')' (':' type=JvmTypeReference)?

Unit Test

We’ll extend the language test-driven, thus we first create a unit test that uses the new feature, but will fail first until we have successfully implemented it. Fortunately there is already a suitable test class in project org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.tests.

We extend the class ParserTest.xtend:

	def void testOverriddenKeyword() {
		val model = '''
			package example {
			  entity MyEntity {
			    property : String
			    op foo(String s) {
			    	return s!= null && s.length > 0 AND s.startsWith("bar")
		val pack = model.elements.head as PackageDeclaration
		val entity = pack.elements.head as Entity
		val op = entity.features.last as Operation
		val method = op.jvmElements.head as JvmOperation
		Assert::assertEquals("boolean", method.returnType.simpleName)

Note the Operation body, the expression uses both presentations of the And-operator.

return s!= null && s.length > 0 AND s.startsWith("bar")

When the ParserTest is executed it will now fail, of course, but only for the AND keyword:

java.lang.AssertionError: Expected no errors, but got :
ERROR (org.eclipse.xtext.diagnostics.Diagnostic.Linking) 
'The method or field AND is undefined' 
on XFeatureCall, offset 119, length 3
ERROR (org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.validation.IssueCodes.unreachable_code) 'Unreachable expression.' on XFeatureCall, offset 119, length 3

	at org.eclipse.xtext.junit4.validation.ValidationTestHelper.assertNoErrors(
	at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.tests.ParserTest.testOverriddenKeyword(

Overloading the operator rules

Looking at Xbase.xtext shows that Xbase defines separate data type rules for operators:


Xtext’s Grammar Mixin feature allows a redefinition of those rules. The obvious customization is in Domainmodel.xtext:

	'||' | 'OR';
	'&&' | 'AND';

Regenerating the language’s Xtext implementation makes those keywords available to the syntax. However, the unit test still fails, but now with a different error:

java.lang.AssertionError: Expected no errors, but got :
ERROR (org.eclipse.xtext.diagnostics.Diagnostic.Linking) 
'AND cannot be resolved.' on XBinaryOperation, offset 119, length 3

	at org.eclipse.xtext.junit4.validation.ValidationTestHelper.assertNoErrors(
	at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.tests.ParserTest.testOverriddenKeyword(


The missing piece is a customization of class OperatorMapping. Thus we create a subclass OperatorMappingCustom with constant QualifiedNames for the additional operator keywords and bind it in DomainmodelRuntimeModule:

public class OperatorMappingCustom extends OperatorMapping {
	public static final QualifiedName AND_2 = create("AND");
	public static final QualifiedName OR_2 = create("OR");
public class DomainmodelRuntimeModule extends AbstractDomainmodelRuntimeModule {
	public Class bindOperatorMapping() {
		return OperatorMappingCustom.class;

A naive approach is here to overload the initializeMapping(), as the Javadoc suggests (“Clients may want to override #initializeMapping() to add other operators.“):

But this fails again: Guice creation errors:

1) Error injecting constructor, java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: value already present: operator_and
  at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.OperatorMappingCustom.(Unknown Source)
  at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.OperatorMappingCustom.class(Unknown Source)
  while locating org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.OperatorMappingCustom
  while locating org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.scoping.featurecalls.OperatorMapping
    for field at org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.util.XExpressionHelper.operatorMapping(Unknown Source)
  while locating org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.util.XExpressionHelper
    for field at org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.validation.XbaseValidator.expressionHelper(Unknown Source)
  at org.eclipse.xtext.service.MethodBasedModule.configure(
  while locating org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.validation.DomainmodelJavaValidator
Caused by: java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: value already present: operator_and
	at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.OperatorMappingCustom.initializeMapping(
	at org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.scoping.featurecalls.OperatorMapping.(
	at org.eclipse.xtext.example.domainmodel.OperatorMappingCustom.(
	at sun.reflect.NativeConstructorAccessorImpl.newInstance0(Native Method)

Instead, the method getMethodName() must be overridden and delegate the invocations of the new operators to the existing ones. The resulting OperatorMappingCustom is then:

public class OperatorMappingCustom extends OperatorMapping {
	public static final QualifiedName AND_2 = create("AND");
	public static final QualifiedName OR_2 = create("OR");

	public QualifiedName getMethodName(QualifiedName operator) {
		if (AND_2.equals(operator)) {
			return getMethodName(AND);
		if (OR_2.equals(operator)) {
			return getMethodName(OR);
		return super.getMethodName(operator);

Finally, the unit test will execute successful.


Xbase allows customization of operators by overriding the operator’s data type rule from Xbase.xtext. This adds the operator keywords to the language, but fails at runtime. Additionaly the class OperatorMapping must be customized and method getMethodName() overloaded.

Redirecting Maven transfer messages to a file

One thing that is often bothering me about Maven is the extensive logging of download messages. Usually I am not interested in these messages unless something is really wrong, and then it is important to know, which URLs are accessed for download.

Before Maven 3.1 there were only poor chances to influence this behavior through the CLI. There were the options “-q” (quiet) and “-B” (batch mode), which influence the TransferListener implementation used by the Maven main class MavenCLI.

(from MavenCLI 3.0.4):

if ( quiet )
    transferListener = new QuietMavenTransferListener();
else if ( request.isInteractiveMode() )
    transferListener = new ConsoleMavenTransferListener( System.out );
    transferListener = new BatchModeMavenTransferListener( System.out );

With Maven 3.1 it was decided to use SLF4J as logging API. When using batch mode (-B), Maven will use Slf4jMavenTransferListener for logging, which is determined by method getBatchTransferListener().

(from MavenCLI 3.2.5):

if ( quiet )
    transferListener = new QuietMavenTransferListener();
else if ( request.isInteractiveMode() && !cliRequest.commandLine.hasOption( CLIManager.LOG_FILE ) )
    // If we're logging to a file then we don't want the console transfer listener as it will spew
    // download progress all over the place
    transferListener = getConsoleTransferListener();
    transferListener = getBatchTransferListener();

protected TransferListener getBatchTransferListener()
    return new Slf4jMavenTransferListener();

By default, the SLF4J SimpleLogger is used, which can be configured by the file


This allows already some decent influence on the message layout, threshold etc. Transfer messages can be suppressed by adding this property to the file:

All info level transfer messages will be suppressed, but this would also cover upload messages when deploying artifacts.

For a more advanced set up, the underyling logging framework can be replaced, e.g. with Log4J2. To do so, follow these simple steps:

1) delete lib/slf4j-simple-<version>.jar
2) add to lib/ folder:
3) add to conf/logging folder file log4j2.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<Configuration status="INFO">
<Console name="Console" target="SYSTEM_OUT">
<!-- layout see -->
<PatternLayout pattern="[%level] %msg%n" />
<File name="TransferLog" fileName="mvn_transfer.log" immediateFlush="false" append="false">
<PatternLayout pattern="%msg%n"/>
<Root level="info">
<AppenderRef ref="Console" />
<Logger name="org.apache.maven.cli.transfer.Slf4jMavenTransferListener" level="info" additivity="false">
<AppenderRef ref="TransferLog" />

As a result, all transfer messages will be redirected to file “mvn_transfer.log”, while all other messages go to the console.

Fornax MWE Workflow Maven Plugin 3.5.1 published on Maven Central

The Fornax Workflow plugin is a Maven Plugin that executes MWE/MWE2 workflows within Maven. It has been there for quite some years now, and whoever needed to integrate MWE/MWE2 workflows in a headless build was likely using it. The Fornax Platform has been an address where components around openArchitectureWare, Xpand and Xtext have been developed. While all other subprojects don’t play any role anymore, the Workflow plugin is still in frequent use.

Over the years we had to change the underlying infrastructure some times. The plugin was hosted on the project’s own repository server, and projects using the plugin had to configure an additional plugin repository either in their POMs or settings.xml. This was undesired, but at the end not really a blocker. However, with a recent change of the repository manager, users experienced problems accessing the Fornax repository Currently, this URL is redirected to a server hosted at itemis, and users might get problems with the HTTPS connection.

It always bothered me that we had to host this plugin on a separate repository, and since it is a widely used component, it is logical that it should be available from the Central repository. But it was never a blocker for me. Now finally I got the driver to change this.

Long story short, the plugin is now published at Maven Central as version 3.5.1. I highly recommend to upgrade to this version and remove the Fornax Maven repository from your configuration. The coordinates did not change, they are still org.fornax.toolsupport:fornax-oaw-m2-plugin. I would like to change this sometime in the future (e.g. the name parts “oaw” and “m2” are not up-to-date anymore), maybe with moving development to another project hosting platform.

Version 3.5.1 does not differ much from 3.4.0, which is the version likely used by the world today. The main work was on refactoring the POM and its parent in order to meet the requirements for deployment on Maven Central. Further, I worked on automation of the release process with the maven-release-plugin.

There is one additional feature in 3.5.x: The new property useTestScope can be used to skip dependencies from the test scope for computation of the Java classpath used to execute a workflow in forked mode. On Windows systems the classpath sometimes reaches the limit of allowed command line length, especially since the local Maven repository is below the user’s home directory by default, which has already a rather long path prefix. By default, the plugin will exclude now these test scope dependencies unless the user configures the property explicitly. In 3.5.0 there was a small logical bug with this feature which made the plugin unusable, so please do not use that version. The version 3.5.1 can be used without problems for all using 3.4.0 so far.

svn: missing argument: –password

I am currently setting up the Maven Release Plugin for a project which is stored in a SVN repository. The plugin needs to do modifications in the repository, for which it executes a svn command. The credentials it gets from ~/.m2/settings.xml, and the password is passed with the --password parameter. On the command line the password is masked.

Now I ran into the trouble that the svn command fails to execute with the message

svn: missing argument: --password

The complete output is:

[INFO] Executing: /bin/sh -c cd /Users/thoms/Development/projects/fornax/ws/fornax-parent && svn --username kthoms --password '*****' --no-auth-cache --non-interactive status
[INFO] Working directory: /Users/thoms/Development/projects/fornax/ws/fornax-parent
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] Total time: 7.031s
[INFO] Finished at: Wed Nov 26 09:39:38 CET 2014
[INFO] Final Memory: 10M/24M
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[ERROR] Failed to execute goal org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-release-plugin:2.5.1:prepare (default-cli) on project fornax-parent: Unable to check for local modifications
[ERROR] Provider message:
[ERROR] The svn command failed.
[ERROR] Command output:
[ERROR] svn: missing argument: --password
[ERROR] Geben Sie »svn help« für weitere Hilfe ein.

I could not explain this, since obviously a svn command was executed with passing my password. So I copied only the svn command and executed this only from command line:

svn --username kthoms --password MYPLAINPASSWORD --no-auth-cache --non-interactive update

Same effect.

Finally I found out that the password itself was causing the problem. Without telling too much I can say it started with the ‘#’ character. This lead to the fact that on shell this was interpreted as a comment. At the end this is completely logical, but I did not think about that scenario when choosing the password. And the error message was a bit misleading here.

grep command to filter distinct values from XML tags

I have a ton of Oracle Forms XML export files and wanted to know, which different patterns occur for the value of the FormatMask XML attribute. The input looks as follows:

<Item Name="CREATION_DATE" UpdateAllowed="false" DirtyInfo="false" Visible="false" QueryAllowed="false" InsertAllowed="false" Comment="TABLE ALIAS&amp;#10;  FDA&amp;#10;&amp;#10;BASED ON TABLE&amp;#10;  TMI_FINANCIAL_DATA&amp;#10;&amp;#10;COLUMN USAGES&amp;#10;  ...    CREATION_DATE                 SEL&amp;#10;" ParentModule="OBJLIB1" Width="10" Required="false" ColumnName="CREATION_DATE" DataType="Date" ParentModuleType="25" Label="Creation Date" ParentType="15" ParentName="QMSSO$QUERY_ONLY_ITEM" MaximumLength="10" PersistentClientInfoLength="142" ParentFilename="tmiolb65_mla.olb" FormatMask="DD-MM-RRRR">

A naive grep command would print out the whole line, including the file name. After some iterations I came to the following command, which does what I want in a single line.

grep -R -h -o -e FormatMask=\"[^\"]* * | sed 's/FormatMask="//g' | sort | uniq

What the command does is:

  • grep recursively (-R) for a regular expression (-e)
  • search for FormatMask="<any-char-until-quotation>
  • print only the matching part of the line (-o). This will include the prefix FormatMask="
  • print without the file name (-h)
  • strip off the prefix with sed
  • sort the results alphabetically
  • remove duplicate lines (uniq)

The result (excerpt)is: