EclipseCon Europe 2016 – I’m coming!

130x130 I'm Speaking logo

I’m sitting now in the train on my way to Ludwigsburg. For sure I cannot miss this great event, where so many smart people and friends come together. Although ECE is always at the same time of the year and I knew for long that I want to go there again, it comes not at the best time for me – or better: for my family. The reason is a really positive one: Almost 3 weeks ago on October 4th I became for the second time father of a lovely daughter, Sophia.

IMG_1433.jpg

I am missing her already deeply, and my wife would need some supporting hands at home right now. However she understands that EclipseCon is important for me and supports me. The past weeks I did not get much sleep, but the reason was mostly not Sophia, but mainly preparing my talks – in the late evening and night it was most suitable. I will definitely enjoy EclipseCon, but this year I will also be happy when I can leave towards home again and will take 3 days off afterwards for regeneration and caring for the family.

This year’s EclipseCon will be fully packed for me. Today, on Sunday, it will start with a small pre-conference event at the Rossknecht, where the Eclipse Scout community comes together. Tomorrow at the Unconference day I will attend the Eclipse Scout User Day, which I attended the past two years already. At the moment I do not work with Scout, but I really enjoyed working with this framework in the past and would like to do another project with it again. The recent year Scout has much evolved, and I am keen to learn all the news.

On tuesday the Xtext developers plan to schedule a BoF Session. A beta of Xtext 2.11 was released this week, and we have to work much now to make the 2.11 release round. I plan to invest quite some time on this, and we have to talk about the concrete tasks and collaboration. Since we are now a team spanning several companies, it is important to have the chance to get the whole team together at EclipseCon.

On wednesday it is time for action. I was recently contacted that the proposal for the session “Recipes to build Code Generators for Non-Xtext Models with Xtend” got picked from the waiting list. I will perform the talk with my colleague and friend Holger Schill.

screenshot 68.png

We give this talk because Xtend is a very nice language when it comes to developing template based code generators, but is mostly only used in the context of Xtext. Xtext projects seamlessly integrate a generator infrastructure with Xtend, but it is not that common to use Xtend based generators with models that are not Xtext DSL files. We will show how simple it can be to integrate Xtend for other use cases, e.g. with JSON as input.

After that talk we will participate at the Modeling Symposium (17:45 Theater Stage). There we will shortly (7 minutes slot only) present a generator fragment that creates an extension package for VisualStudio Code to embed support for a DSL with an embedded language server. The Language Server Protocol support is the main feature for Xtext 2.11. We plan to contribute the created generator fragment to the Xtext project.

On thursday it is time for my talk “From stairway to heaven onto the highway to hell with Xtext” (11:00 Theater Stage). In this talk I will explain why I love Xtext and why it is used successfully in so many projects first, but then discuss where users have or run into trouble when using the framework. We see in many projects that first steps are easily done and don’t require much experience, but as requirements grow the complexity of DSL projects also grow and extensive experience with details of Xtext and the technologies behind is crucial. I hopefully compiled an informative set of issues.

screenshot 69.png

Preparations for CodeGeneration 2013

As I am addicted to code generation and DSLs, the CodeGeneration conference in Cambridge is always a must each year. Last year I could not make it, since I had the chance to speak at EclipseCon North America, which was in the same week. This year Mark took EclipseCon into his considerations (it was last week), so me and my colleagues from itemis will be there again. Actually, this year we will be more itemis guys then ever. Mark already assumed in his opening words at CG2011 that almost everyone from itemis would be there, this year we prove itemis is larger. I think our company is so close related to the conference theme that it is natural that we have lots to present, and much interest to hear others about what they are doing and have learned in the past.

screenshot 2013-04-05 um 10.55.19

Before the actual CodeGeneration conference starts on Wednesday, there are some pre-conference activities. My colleagues Holger Schill and Moritz Eysholdt will hold an intensive 2-day Xtext workshop on monday and tuesday.

I will arrive monday noon, since I take the early flight directly from my hometown Dortmund to London Luton. From there, I have to take a 2 hour bus trip to Cambridge. In the evening, I plan to meet Holger, Moritz, Meinte Boersma and hopefully some others in the Castle Inn pub. When you arrive on monday, drop into the Castle Inn roughly at 20 PM (I guess we go to a restaurant before). You can reach me there on my mobile phone: screenshot 2013-04-05 um 12.30.02

DSC00412

On tuesday this year’s Language Workbench Challenge summit takes place. We have 14 submissions (wow!) for the LWC13 assignment. I have been working on the Xtext submission together with 2 colleagues, Johannes Dicks and Thomas Kutz. The results are available as open-source project lwc13-xtext at Eclipselabs. We have prepared a detailed step-by-step tutorial as submission paper. The resulting document LWC13-XtextSubmission.pdf is available for download. On the project homepage I have placed today a quick start tutorial. Oh boy, this project did cost some time. The actual solution is not much code, but as often, it is harder to write less code than more. It could be even less, but we took care of that the code is readable and understandable. And writing the document is at least that much work as the implementation.

screenshot 2013-04-08 um 13.52.06

Every presenter has only 15 minutes to present their approach. 15 minutes presentation for that much work. I guess that the other participants did invest also quite some time. Both of my co-authors got the chance to visit the conference, and Thomas will support me with the presentation. He will demo the resulting JSF application and DSL source code while I do the main talking. We did a test run of the talk yesterday evening, and easily exceeded 20 minutes. I think Angelo will bring his egg timer again, which begs no pardon with the talk time of speakers. But only that way we will be able to run 14 talks on one day. We will have to restrict on the most important aspects only.

Besides my colleagues Thomas and Johannes also Sven Lange will join us then. I have the pleasure to work with him in my long-time project at Deutsche Börse (German Stock Exchange), now since over half a year. Sven is a highly motivated, skilled and smart person. It is still the same project I have reported about at CodeGeneration 2009 together with my former colleague Heiko Behrens. Sven is full-time working on this project, while I am for 20% scheduled. We have migrated here a huge code generator project from Xpand to Xtend. This alone would be worth an experience report session. Sven is working on Xtend support for IntelliJ, which he might present in a Lightning Talk on wednesday.

Wednesday the conference will start. I will have my main talk “Alive and Kicking with Code Generation” together with Dr. Boris Baginski from ATOSS Software AG after lunch at 13:45.

screenshot 2013-04-05 um 10.57.34

Currently we are finalizing our presentation slides. Boris has been ill for some days and busy with a new release of their ASES product, a workforce management suite. This is really an interesting customer and project. They are evolving this product now for 25 years, and they make use of code generation for ages. I think one can say that it helped them to survive in their business, some contestants did not manage to make larger platform shifts and died. Most of them tried a big-bang replacement, but the business is too fast evolving so that the target is moving steadily. Boris and I will speak about this product and how it has been evolved over the years. ATOSS was one of the first major projects using openArchitectureWare 4 (which mainly means Xpand), and now they are currently preparing a shift to Xtend.

I am glad that this talk is already on wednesday, I never come to rest until I finished some talk. After it, I can just relax and enjoy the conference. I am expecting some interesting insights on different approaches. Especially experience reports are interesting for me. I did not finally decide which sessions I will attend. At the moment I plan to see John Hutchinson with “The Use of Model-Driven Development in Industry” in the morning, and Darius Silingas with “Why MDA Fails: Analysis of Unsuccessful Cases” in the afternoon.

In the evening it is again time for the punting boat tour. I already attended three times, but it will be great fun again for sure. Let’s hope the weather is not too bad. I saw a prediction of ~10°C and possibility of light shower. In the past we had luck, and on a warm, sunny day the tour is double fun. However, I’ll better put an umbrella into the suitcase.

On thursday I have again an active part in the hands-on session “Have Your Language Built While You Wait”, which is hosted by Risto Pohjonen from MetaCase. The idea of this session is that attendees can get a DSL with the language workbench of their choice built with the help of experts for this workbench. Of course I will assist on Xtext. If you had no chance to visit the Xtext workshop this might be your chance to get some hands on Xtext. This session was already run last year successfully. Last year my colleague Benjamin Schwertfeger took over the Xtext part, since we were at EclipseCon.

There are also some other talks around Xtext and Xtend. Both have been released in version 2.4 on March 20th, which brings some interesting new features. Most notably in regard to code generation are the Active Annotations. I guess this is also part of what Sven Efftinge will adress as future of code generation in his keynote “The Past, Present and Future of Code Generation” wednesday morning. More details he will present together with Sebastian Zarnekow in the tutorial “Internal DSLs with Xtend” (thursday 10:45-12:00). The last Xtext related talk will be from Moritz Eysholdt, called “Executable Specifications for Xtext Languages” (friday 10:45-12:15). I am actually not sure which of these talks I will attend personally. They are most relevant for my work, and I don’t work close enough with them to catch everything new in Xtext on my own. Thus, I’ll definetely would learn important aspects. On the other side, there are also other interesting talks in parallel.

The coming week will be an intensive experience with lots to learn and interesting persons to meet. Although I will really enjoy this time, I will be glad when I finally come back home. At the moment, my family is ill and I hope that I get not infected these days. I have been looking forward and worked for this event, so I am crossing fingers when I can board monday morning healthy.

I am sure the organizing team around Mark and Jacqui will do again a great job.

DSC00363

See you there and let’s make this event special!

Unofficial release 2.2.2 of the Xtend Maven Plugin

In my previous post I showed how to use the maven-xtend-plugin to compile Xtend sources within a Maven build. This worked fine in simple cases, but there was a limitation of only one supported source directory (the one configured by build/sourceDirectory property), see Bug#367914. Unfortunately already each Xtext project has already 2 source folders (src and src-gen), so this made the plugin unusable for Xtext projects and forced checking in the generated Java files. This causes terrible problems with version control, especially when working on a team.

In the meantime Bug#367914 was resolved, but only for the upcoming Xtend 2.3 (Eclipse Juno) version. This urgent bugfix was not available on a Maven repository. But I needed it for project Spray to finally get rid of the merge conflicts and delete the generated sources from the repository (issue#94). Spray is still using Xtext/Xtend version 2.2.1 and depends on public available Maven artifacts. Since the bugfix won’t be available from the Xtend project for the 2.2.1 release and Eclipse Juno is still some way to go I decided to backport the current 2.3.0 M6 sources of the Xtend Maven Plugin to 2.2.x and create an unofficial version 2.2.2. This plugin I have deployed to the Fornax Repository to make it public available.

For an usage example refer to the POMs of project Spray: pom.xml, parent pom.xml.

Xtext 2.2 finally brings Maven support for Xtend

I cannot tell how often I was asked since introduction of Xtend2 how to compile them in a Maven build. This was just not possible until now due to the problem that to load and compile an Xtend class it is necessary to compile all of the Java classes that the Xtend class on before, and Java classes might depend on Xtend classes to be translated in order to be compilable.

Xtext 2.2.0 was just released yesterday, and for me the most important new feature is direct support through the xtend-maven-plugin plugin. I could not hesitate to test this feature, and created a small example.

Scenario

I have set up a small Maven project with 2 Java classes and 1 Xtend class that depend on each other.

To translate XtendClass1 to Java code and compile it requires that JavaClass1 is compiled before, and to compile JavaClass2 it is necessary that XtendClass is translated to Java code before.

Maven POM Configuration

I have decided to not use Maven Tycho for this example, and use the typical structure of an Eclipse project with usage of Xtend, i.e. sources in folder /src (instead /src/main/java) and xtend-gen to generate the Java code for Xtend classes to.

Repositories

Since shortly Xtext artifacts are available on maven.eclipse.org. The new Maven plugin is available on http://build.eclipse.org/common/xtend/maven/

	<repositories>
		<repository>
			<id>maven.eclipse.org</id>
			<url>http://maven.eclipse.org/nexus/content/groups/public/</url>
		</repository>
		<repository>
			<id>xtend</id>
			<url>http://build.eclipse.org/common/xtend/maven/</url>
		</repository>
	</repositories>
	<pluginRepositories>
		<pluginRepository>
			<id>xtend</id>
			<url>http://build.eclipse.org/common/xtend/maven/</url>
		</pluginRepository>
		<pluginRepository>
			<id>fornax</id>
			<url>http://fornax-platform.org/nexus/content/groups/public/</url>
		</pluginRepository>
	</pluginRepositories>

Dependencies

This small project setup requires just a mimimal set of dependencies to be configured:

	<dependencies>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>org.eclipse.xtend2</groupId>
			<artifactId>org.eclipse.xtend2.lib</artifactId>
			<version>2.2.0</version>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>org.eclipse.xtext</groupId>
			<artifactId>org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.lib</artifactId>
			<version>2.2.0.v201112061305</version>
		</dependency>
		<dependency>
			<groupId>com.google.inject</groupId>
			<artifactId>com.google.inject</artifactId>
			<version>2.0.0.v201105231817</version>
		</dependency>
	</dependencies>

Source folders

The main source folder src/ can be configured with the build/sourceDirectory setting, for xtend-gen we need the support of the build-helper-maven-plugin.

	<build>
		<sourceDirectory>src</sourceDirectory>
		<plugins>
			<plugin>
				<groupId>org.codehaus.mojo</groupId>
				<artifactId>build-helper-maven-plugin</artifactId>
				<version>1.7</version>
				<executions>
					<execution>
						<id>add-source</id>
						<phase>generate-sources</phase>
						<goals>
							<goal>add-source</goal>
						</goals>
						<configuration>
							<sources>
								<source>xtend-gen</source>
							</sources>
						</configuration>
					</execution>
				</executions>
			</plugin>
			...

The xtend-gen folder must be emptied when executing mvn clean, this requires some additional configuration of the maven-clean-plugin.

			<plugin>
				<artifactId>maven-clean-plugin</artifactId>
				<version>2.4.1</version>
				<configuration>
					<filesets>
						<fileset>
							<directory>xtend-gen</directory>
							<includes>
								<include>**</include>
							</includes>
						</fileset>
					</filesets>
				</configuration>
			</plugin>

xtend-maven-plugin

Now let’s finally come to the Xtend plugin. The plugin is configured as follows:

			<plugin>
				<groupId>org.eclipse.xtend2</groupId>
				<artifactId>xtend-maven-plugin</artifactId>
				<version>2.2.2</version>
				<executions>
					<execution>
						<goals>
							<goal>compile</goal>
							<goal>testCompile</goal>
						</goals>
						<configuration>
							<outputDirectory>xtend-gen</outputDirectory>
						</configuration>
					</execution>
				</executions>
			</plugin>

The outputDirectory is optional, but leaving it out the sources are generated to src/main/xtend-gen, and we want to generate to xtend-gen in the project root.

The plugin does not define a lifecycle mapping for M2E, which leads to an error marker “Plugin execution not covered by lifecycle configuration”. This is a well known issue when using M2E, and requires some additional work on the plugin. I have opened Bug#366118 for this.

Sample Project

The project described above is shared on Github: https://github.com/kthoms/xtext-experimental

In Eclipse the project looks like this after import (assuming the M2E plugin installed):

Build Execution

The classes in the project can now be built using mvn clean install. This will produce the following output:

[INFO] Scanning for projects...
[INFO]                                                                         
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] Building xtend-maven-classic 2.2.0-SNAPSHOT
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] 
[INFO] --- maven-clean-plugin:2.4.1:clean (default-clean) @ xtend-maven-classic ---
[INFO] Deleting /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target
[INFO] Deleting /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/xtend-gen (includes = [**], excludes = [])
[INFO] 
[INFO] --- build-helper-maven-plugin:1.7:add-source (add-source) @ xtend-maven-classic ---
[INFO] Source directory: /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/xtend-gen added.
[INFO] 
[INFO] --- xtend-maven-plugin:2.2.0:compile (default) @ xtend-maven-classic ---
[WARNING] 
WARNING: 	XtendClass1.xtend - /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src/mypackage/XtendClass1.xtend
7: The value of the field XtendClass1.cls is not used
[INFO] Compiling 1 source file to xtend-gen
[INFO] 
[INFO] --- maven-resources-plugin:2.4.3:resources (default-resources) @ xtend-maven-classic ---
[WARNING] Using platform encoding (MacRoman actually) to copy filtered resources, i.e. build is platform dependent!
[INFO] skip non existing resourceDirectory /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src/main/resources
[INFO] 
[INFO] --- maven-compiler-plugin:2.3.2:compile (default-compile) @ xtend-maven-classic ---
[WARNING] File encoding has not been set, using platform encoding MacRoman, i.e. build is platform dependent!
[INFO] Compiling 3 source files to /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target/classes
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] BUILD SUCCESS
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------
[INFO] Total time: 3.923s
[INFO] Finished at: Thu Dec 08 23:01:42 CET 2011
[INFO] Final Memory: 20M/81M
[INFO] ------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the output it can be seen that at the end 3 Java classes are compiled, after the xtend-maven-plugin created the Java code for the Xtend class.

Enabling debug output with -X reveals some more insight, how the plugin works:

[DEBUG] Configuring mojo 'org.eclipse.xtend2:xtend-maven-plugin:2.2.0:compile' with basic configurator -->
[DEBUG]   (f) outputDirectory = xtend-gen
[DEBUG]   (f) project = MavenProject: org.eclipse.xtext.example:xtend-maven-classic:2.2.0-SNAPSHOT @ /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/pom.xml
[DEBUG]   (f) tempDirectory = /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target/xtend
[DEBUG] -- end configuration --
[DEBUG] load xtend file 'file:/Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src/mypackage/XtendClass1.xtend'
[DEBUG] Parsing took: 42 ms
...
[DEBUG] create java stub 'mypackage/XtendClass1.java'
[DEBUG] invoke batch compiler with '-cp /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtend2/org.eclipse.xtend2.lib/2.2.0/org.eclipse.xtend2.lib-2.2.0.jar:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/guava/guava/10.0.1/guava-10.0.1.jar:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/code/findbugs/jsr305/1.3.9/jsr305-1.3.9.jar:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtext/org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.lib/2.2.0.v201112061305/org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.lib-2.2.0.v201112061305.jar:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtext/org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.lib/2.2.0.v201112061305/org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.lib-2.2.0.v201112061305.jar:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/inject/com.google.inject/2.0.0.v201105231817/com.google.inject-2.0.0.v201105231817.jar -d /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target/xtend/classes -1.5 -proceedOnError /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src /Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target/xtend/stubs'
[DEBUG] classpath used for Xtend compilation : [file:/Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src/, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtend2/org.eclipse.xtend2.lib/2.2.0/org.eclipse.xtend2.lib-2.2.0.jar, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/guava/guava/10.0.1/guava-10.0.1.jar, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/code/findbugs/jsr305/1.3.9/jsr305-1.3.9.jar, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtext/org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.lib/2.2.0.v201112061305/org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.lib-2.2.0.v201112061305.jar, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/org/eclipse/xtext/org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.lib/2.2.0.v201112061305/org.eclipse.xtext.xbase.lib-2.2.0.v201112061305.jar, file:/Users/thoms/.m2/repository/com/google/inject/com.google.inject/2.0.0.v201105231817/com.google.inject-2.0.0.v201105231817.jar, file:/Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/src/, file:/Users/thoms/git/xtext-experimental/maven/xtend.maven/target/xtend/classes/]

The plugin invokes the Xtend Batch compiler through a spawned JVM. The batch compiler is realized in class org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.compiler.batch.Xtend2BatchCompiler from the newly added plugin org.eclipse.xtext.xtend2.standalone.

After the build XtendClass1.java is generated as expected to xtend-gen. When opening the target folder it can be seen that the plugin produces a Java stub class to target/stubs for the Xtend class. Finally, everything is compiled and the project is clean 🙂

Limitation

The plugin only takes one source folder into account, namely the one configured by build/sourceDirectory. This is a problem when you have multiple source folders, which is quite typical for Xtext projects, namely src and src-gen. This is reported as , which is fixed in the meantime. I have deployed a patched version as unofficial release 2.2.2.

Conclusion

I deeply desired this plugin and this finally allows that the xtend-gen folder does not need to be checked in. The sample used here was just simple. Next would be a real life project were I want to apply the plugin, most likely in Project Spray. This project uses Xtend based code generation heavily and Maven Tycho for the build. The project has not been upgraded to Xtext 2.2.0 (of course, it was just released), and I guess we have to upgrade to Xtext 2.2.0 before we can use the plugin. But if this allows us to finally remove the xtend-gen folders from the repository this alone is worth upgrading.

Nice work, Xtext team!

Moving an Xtend generator into its own plugin

One of the nice things that you get when starting an Xtext project is an Xtend based generator that is automatically invoked when you save an Xtext model file. The Xtend generator for your language resides in the .generator subpackage of your language. The problem with that is that it is usually no good idea to have the generator bundled with your language. It is a completely seperate feature which is reasonable to put it in an own plugin. Further, the DSL plugins must not depend on the generator plugin, the dependency must be vice versa. This article describes the steps that need to be done for this.

As a reference take the sources from project Spray. There you can find an concrete example where the described steps have been applied.

Create the generator plugins

Create two additional plugins: One for the runtime part of the generator, one for the UI contributions.

Generator runtime plugin

Move everything from the .generator subpackage of your DSL runtime project to the generator plugin. (In Spray this is org.eclipselabs.spray.generator.graphiti). The dependencies are the same as in the DSL runtime project, but add the DSL runtime plugin as additional dependency (see this MANIFEST.MF as reference). Don’t forget to add an xtend-gen source folder to the project.

Guice module for runtime plugin

Create a Module class extending AbstractGenericModule in the runtime plugin. In this module at least the IGenerator implementation class must be bound.

public class GraphitiGeneratorModule extends AbstractGenericModule {
    public Class<? extends org.eclipse.xtext.generator.IGenerator> bindIGenerator() {
        return SprayGenerator.class;
    }
    ...
}

Generator UI plugin

The UI plugin must basically bind the JavaProjectBasedBuilderParticipant in its own module and register it through the org.eclipse.xtext.builder.participant extension point. These steps are required:

UI Guice Module

Create a module class extending AbstractGenericModule and bind JavaProjectBasedBuilderParticipant:

public class GraphitiGeneratorUIModule extends AbstractGenericModule {
    private final AbstractUIPlugin plugin;
    
    public GraphitiGeneratorUIModule (AbstractUIPlugin plugin) {
        this.plugin = plugin;
    }

    @Override
    public void configure(Binder binder) {
        super.configure(binder);
        binder.bind(AbstractUIPlugin.class).toInstance(plugin);
        binder.bind(IDialogSettings.class).toInstance(plugin.getDialogSettings());
    }
    /**
     * Bind the JavaProjectBasedBuilderParticipant in order to invoke the generator during the build.
     */
    public Class<? extends org.eclipse.xtext.builder.IXtextBuilderParticipant> bindIXtextBuilderParticipant() {
        return org.eclipse.xtext.builder.JavaProjectBasedBuilderParticipant.class;
    }

    ...
}

Activator class

Create a class Activator which creates a Guice injector from the modules:

  1. DSL runtime module
  2. org.eclipse.xtext.ui.shared.SharedStateModule
  3. DSL UI module
  4. Generator runtime module
  5. Generator UI module
public class Activator extends AbstractUIPlugin {
	private Injector injector;
	private static Activator INSTANCE;

	public Injector getInjector() {
		return injector;
	}
	
	@Override
	public void start(BundleContext context) throws Exception {
		super.start(context);
		INSTANCE = this;
		try {
		    injector = Guice.createInjector(Modules2.mixin(new SprayRuntimeModule(), new SharedStateModule(), new SprayUiModule(this), new GraphitiRuntimeModule(), new GraphitiGeneratorModule(), new GraphitiGeneratorUIModule(this)));
		} catch (Exception e) {
			Logger.getLogger(getClass()).error(e.getMessage(), e);
			throw e;
		}
	}
	
	@Override
	public void stop(BundleContext context) throws Exception {
		injector = null;
		super.stop(context);
	}
	
	public static Activator getInstance() {
		return INSTANCE;
	}
	
}

Open the manifest editor. On the “Overview” page enter the Activator class name. Also check the options “Activate this plug-in when one of its classes is loaded” and “This plug-in is a singleton”.

ExecutableExtensionFactory

Create a class ExecutableExtensionFactory. Since this class won’t be public API it is a good approach to put it into an internal package.

public class ExecutableExtensionFactory extends AbstractGuiceAwareExecutableExtensionFactory {

	@Override
	protected Bundle getBundle() {
		return Activator.getInstance().getBundle();
	}
	
	@Override
	protected Injector getInjector() {
		return Activator.getInstance().getInjector();
	}
	
}

plugin.xml

Add a plugin.xml with the following content:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<?eclipse version="3.4"?>
<plugin>
   <extension
         point="org.eclipse.xtext.builder.participant">
      <participant
            class="org.eclipselabs.spray.generator.graphiti.ui.internal.ExecutableExtensionFactory:org.eclipse.xtext.builder.IXtextBuilderParticipant">
      </participant>
   </extension>
</plugin>

Check that the ExecutableExtensionFactory class name matches yours.

Remove the GeneratorFragment

Open the .mwe2 workflow of your DSL project. Remove the entry for the GeneratorFragment:

// Code generator
fragment = generator.GeneratorFragment {
  generateJavaMain = false 
  generateMwe = false
  generatorStub = true 
}

Now regenerate the DSL.

Add binding for IWorkspaceRoot

The generator fragment contributes a binding for IWorkspaceRoot to the UI Module of your DSL, which is required by the builder participant. Therefore this binding must be added manually to your UI Module.

public class SprayUiModule extends AbstractSprayUiModule {
    ...
    public org.eclipse.core.resources.IWorkspaceRoot bindIWorkspaceRootToInstance() {
        return org.eclipse.core.resources.ResourcesPlugin.getWorkspace().getRoot();
    }
}

Result

As a result your DSL plugins should have no dependencies on your generator plugin. When you save a model file in your Eclipse instance with the deployed plugins the code generator should be invoked. The pattern described here would also allow to create multiple generator plugins for the same DSL which are invoked independently when building the project. Each of them registers its own builder participant and invokes its own generator.

Using fit4oaw for complex Xtend functions

This is my first try to use posterous. I’m excited what this service will provide me. To have something worthful to write about I decided to write about my current work I’m on today.
I have a customer who has defined a data transformation language with Xtext. Part of this language are declarations and usages of variables. No wonder. Of course variables can be used just within their scope – and here it becomes interesting. Xtext does not provide this out-of-the-box. The functions that we need to detect scoping are rather complex to develop. Basically we need just one function which detects for a given variable reference if the referenced variable is within the scope.
I use fit4oaw to go for a test-first approach. This helps me develop this function test-driven.
As you can see from this screenshot I evaluate expressions and compare their results. In the loaded model there are several variable references, and the function inScope() detects whether the referred variable is in scope. Now I have managed to get them all green, but work is not completely done. I now have to construct more complex situations and I know of at least one situation that would fail now. So – change the test model, add the test and it should fail again. Then develop further on the functions to handle this situation and the test should execute successful.
Writing complex Xtend functions was never so easy!

Posted via email from Karsten’s Blog